Biteable

In the age of Ted Talks, Slideshare and even Powerpoint, there’s really no excuse for a bad presentation. For an experienced presenter, even the most boring information can be presented in an interesting way. We’ve compiled a list of the best of the best presentations we’ve seen to get you inspired.

1. Work Rules by Laszlo Block

This presentation is a masterpiece of design, pacing and structure. The typefaces give it a fun, humorous approach and the text is written in deceptively simple, easily digestible sentences. Each idea is explored in just enough detail to get the point across but not enough detail to become boring. Notice the clever use of the page-filling type as a palette cleanser, signalling the introduction of a new idea.


2. Eleven Reasons Why I Will Never Hire You by Mark O’Toole

Despite a sometimes slightly messy mix of different fonts and illustration styles, this presentation gets the message across in a visually interesting and humorous way. The text per slide is extremely streamlined, nothing is wasted in the delivery of each point, and the points that are made are useful and relevant.


3. 10 Ways to be a Marketing Genius Like Lady Gaga by Jesse Desjardins

While the design of this presentation might not be to everyone’s taste, it is in tune with its subject matter and manages to make some very interesting and useful points. This is another example of a presentation that very clearly states a simple idea and then explores it with data (in this case, quotes from Lady Gaga) to back it up.


4. How Google Works by Eric Schmidt
 This presentation is probably my favourite on this list because it does everything right. On the design side, it has friendly and consistent design, great illustrations and is harmonious with the Google brand. On the writing side, it covers a lot of ground very quickly, but it also tells a story – the story of how Jonathan and Eric arrived at Google and the evolution of their thinking in the new environment. The writing is fairly factual but is made infinitely more palatable by the stylish, funny cartoons.


5. 52 Presentation Tips by SOAP
This is an extremely polished presentation that a lot of work went into. Although there are obviously a lot of stock images, they have been integrated nicely into the design with the use of colour. Sometimes the flashy arrangement of typography gets in the way of legibility, but overall it is pretty impressive, with some very clever graphic representations of the ideas they are exploring (see slides 20 and 22).


6. Why Follower Count is Bullshit by Mackenzie Fogelson
This presentation rather crudely grabs your attention with a sweary title and then goes on to perpetrate the crime of using text only, yet somehow it works. This is a good lesson in how to use typography and colour to create emphasis and visual interest.


7. You Suck at PowerPoint by Jesse Desjardins
Another presentation that is using ‘edgy’ and provocative language to draw attention to itself, but it also has some fun and interesting design elements. The exclusive use of 1950s stock photography mixed with fairly modern fonts and colors is a great lesson in the use of contrast to create visual interest. While the photographs are slightly cheesy, it is undeniably attention-getting and therefore effective.


 8. Litter Presentation Template by Biteable
Another option for presentations is to make a video, and Biteable is a great way to do it, especially if you have to make a high-quality video quickly. This is great example of how to do it, but is also a template you can easily customise and edit in minutes. Simply go to the templates section, choose this template or the next one below it, log in or sign up, and start editing.

 9. Business Presentation Template by Biteable
Like any creative endeavour, the more time you put in to your presentation, the better you can make it, but by using the lessons learned from some of these great examples of the form, you should be able to make it better faster.

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